Selling Your Home

Become a Landlord or List?

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It is rare that a person’s first home purchase is their “forever home” for a variety of reasons — from the cost of entering the market (especially in pricier markets like DC) to ever-evolving needs (as people marry, divorce, have children, grow older, etc.). When you make that decision that it’s time to find a new home, you also may have to decide if you want to keep your current home or find a new owner…and that can sometimes be an even tougher decision.

If you have paid off or down the mortgage on your first property, you may be in a position to buy your next home without selling (either your cash on hand and DTI ratio will allow or you may be able to apply some of the equity in your current home to help purchase your new home). When that’s the case, you are going to want to ask yourself a few key questions:

  • Do I want to be a landlord? If the answer is a definite “no,” proceed ahead talking with your agent about the best way to maximize your exit from your current property (considering timing and the three P’s). Similarly, if you live in a condo or coop that won’t allow you to rent out your unit (perhaps there is a blanket restriction or a limit on the percentage of units that can be rented), get ready to sell. However, if the answer is “maybe” or “yes,” proceed to the next question.

  • How will being a landlord impact my bottom line? If you have an outstanding mortgage, use that as the base for figuring out your break-even costs. Then take into account additional recurring costs, like condo and HOA fees, ongoing maintenance and paying a property manager (if applicable). Next, compare this to the going market rate for similar rental homes (have your agent gather comps for you and make a recommendation). If the carrying costs exceed or are close to your carrying costs, are you prepared to subsidize the difference to maintain ownership of the home? Also, don’t forget to keep in mind that your home will most likely not be rented 100% of the year and you will have costs to clean and prepare the home for the next tenant(s). Be conservative and calculate a 70-80% utilization if finances may be tight and re-run your numbers.

  • How will this impact my lifestyle? If you can’t afford to hire a property manager (or prefer not to), are you prepared to play that role, potentially getting late night calls when something goes wrong? If so, will you be local and be able to be hands on to ensure repairs are completed and handled in a timely manner? What if you run into larger issues with your tenant? For many people, this isn’t a bother at all. Thinking about how finances impact your lifestyle, if you will be running in the red to maintain ownership, don’t forget to consider how this will impact your purchasing power for your new home and your budget for daily living.

  • What are the potential long-term financial implications? Real estate is an investment and often the largest source of wealth for people. If you are more risk-adverse, real property can feel like a safe way of saving money (in fact, it is forced savings). However, if you prefer to play the stock market or identify other opportunities to invest, you may be able to put proceeds from a sale to a higher and better use. This is very personal consideration and there are no guarantees on returns in any investment, so engage your financial advisor to model out potential scenarios and choose what fits your risk profile and investment strategy. If you’ve dreamed of becoming a real estate mogul, this could just be the first step!

These are just a few of considerations I discuss with my clients during our one-on-one consultations. Being a real estate agent is about more than selling houses; it’s about helping people make their best housing and life decisions. There’s no singular best conclusion, but by enlisting the help of subject-matter experts — from your CPA and financial planner to a local Realtor — you can best discern the right path to your happiness at home.

And a shout out to Pearl and all the landlords out there…may you never have a tenant like this:

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia. 

Fall Market Update: What's In Store for Sellers & Buyers?

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If you’ve worked with a real estate agent to buy or sell a home, you know we are the first to let you know that we are many things but there are some things we are not — lawyers, accountants, tax advisors, inspectors, etc. You also can add psychic to that, meaning we cannot predict what your home will sell for in three years or what interest rates will rise to. That being said, we are in the field every day and are in a better position than most to spot signs of change in the market that could impact your strategy or decision making.

To that end, I wanted to share some statistics that provide food for thought and observations from my experiences and conversations with fellow Realtors® as we head into the fall market. Knowing when is the right time to buy or sell, while it certainly can be impacted by market dynamics, is really mostly about your personal situation. Have you outgrown your current home or are you moving out of the region? Do you have a new job and need a shorter commute? Is what you spend on rent more than what you would spend to buy a comparable or larger home? And those are just a few.

But back to some recent observations:

Housing inventory continues to be tight. When talking about the supply of housing, we look at the months of supply (i.e., if no other properties come on the market, how many months will it be until there are no homes left — assuming the same absorption rate as today). In August 2018 in Washington, DC, there was only 1.76 months of supply (Source: MRIS), which was actually up 9.5% versus last year. To put things in perspective, six months of supply is considered a balanced market. In Arlington, VA, that number increases to a whopping 1.87 (but that’s down nearly 17% from the same time last year). If we look toward Montgomery County, that number jumps to 2.96 in Bethesda but is the lowest of the four cities at 1.74 for Silver Spring. Of course, these numbers vary depending on the specific neighborhood and the housing type (see above) and size (e.g., for townhouses in DC, there is only 1.37 months of supply).

Interest rates are gradually rising. Interest rates have been slowly but surely increasing. In August 2018, the average commitment rate on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages was 4.55% (Source: Freddie Mac). In August 2017, that number was 3.88% with a 2017 average of 3.99%. By contrast, that annual average was as high as 8.05% in 2000. Overall, interest rates are still competitive (nowhere near the 18% rates seen in the fall of 1981) but locking in a rate now can save you meaningful money on your monthly payment and over the life of your mortgage (or until you refinance). It’s important to note that just because the Fed increases interest rates by 0.25%, for example, that doesn’t mean mortgage rates will go up a quarter point (however they usually trend in the same direction).

Average 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rates (Source: Freddie Mac)

Average 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rates (Source: Freddie Mac)

It’s still competitive out there…but not as much as before. It was only earlier this year that we were hearing stories of 15+ offers coming in on area properties. Of late, however, there are still many multiple offer situations and short offer deadlines but to lesser extremes. Many agents attribute this to buyer fatigue (yes, it’s wearing on you to make offer upon offer only to lose out…again). While a buyer last year that heard there was a deadline and multiple offers in hand may have put on their battle gear, some buyers now are talking themselves out of the running and not writing.

Pricing matters more than ever. Pricing is always the most important consideration when taking any property to market. Many sellers (and some agents) mistakenly think that because of the limited inventory and high demand, they can command large premiums. The truth is that while there will always be properties that set new records and buyers willing to waive appraisal contingencies, most buyers are closely examining the comps with their agent-advisor and nervous about overpaying (thinking there may be a growing housing bubble). An overpriced property can sit on the market for weeks or months longer than it should (and time is money, if you’re the seller).

So. what does this mean for you as a seller and/or buyer?

  1. If you need to sell your home, now is a great time to do so (provided you price and market it correctly). However, be prepared to possibly face challenges buying your next home if you are staying in the region and talk to your lender and agent as to timing and how to best set yourself up for success.

  2. If you’re ready to buy but not in a hurry, run the numbers. Having flexibility as to when you can or need to buy is a blessing and a curse. Having a little bit of urgency is helpful when making a decision but, with limited inventory, you can avoid being forced to make a less-than-ideal choice. As interest rates rise, your lender can help you model out the impact of future increases so you can take the extra cost into account when considering each property and the opportunity cost of waiting.

  3. Always be prepared. As a buyer, if you’re ready to move swiftly, you may come out ahead. With lighter competition, what it takes to go from offer to contract may be less than you think. Consider working with a lender that can underwrite your file prior to placing an offer and be ready to see properties as soon as they hit the market (or to explore off-market opportunities your agent may bring to you).

  4. Don’t decide what’s best for you by what others are doing and/or saying. This is true in life and real estate, isn’t it? I started off this post by reminding us that there are dozens of factors that can come into play when deciding whether to buy or sell. Information and analysis are key, so make sure you have a partner who will ask the tough questions (often more than once) and arm you with insights that will help you make the best decision for you.

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia. 

Renovating with a Purpose: Setting Strategy Before Style

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When your space doesn't suit your needs as well as it used to, you may choose to make updates or move on to a home that's a better fit (which may also require updates, whether you are renting or selling). So, how do you decide what to spend your hard-earned money on?

With the proliferation of befores and afters on TV, Pinterest, Instagram and beyond, it's tempting to tear down walls and embrace the latest trend but, before making any changes, you should do so with intention. If you are choosing to sell, a top-notch real estate agent will advise you on what updates you should take on to maximize your potential profit and minimize time on market. If you're not there yet or haven't gotten advice, here are a few questions you should ask before you start shopping for contractors and finishes:

  1. Do I anticipate moving in five years or less? If you are planning to sell or rent your home immediately or in the next few years, you'll want to put the tightest filter on the renovations that you make. As you most likely have heard, kitchens and bathrooms often sell houses; however, that doesn't mean you need to re-do them. Sometimes simple updates like new appliances or countertops or painting vanities and staining grout are the smartest choice. If you are planning to keep the property but find tenants, your criteria should be even more selective and, in both cases for renovations that you do take on, remember that your goal is to not match your tastes perfectly but to appeal to the widest audience (while minimizing your investment within reason).
     
  2. How will my house stack up to its competition? If you are selling or renting, the biggest misstep is often not understanding the local market (and I mean hyper-local) and your competition. While sand-in-place hardwood floors and marble countertops and a decorative backsplash may be the best of the best, is that the norm for your neighborhood? Will prospective buyers or tenants pay a premium for that? This doesn't mean you have to throw style and aesthetics out the window, but you should run the numbers and choose the best option for your budget and your target audience, most importantly.
     
  3. Am I planning to stay indefinitely? If you do plan on staying in the home for years to come, it may make sense to splurge on higher-end finishes and custom features...if they will bring you joy (yes, happiness is worth investing in). In this case, think through the function and form of your spaces. What bothers you on a daily basis -- maybe kitchen drawers that stick or a lack of a laundry room near bedrooms? What have you seen in friend's homes that has you repeatedly saying, "I need that in my next home"? Finally, planning to stay doesn't mean you should inject every current trend in your renovation. Instead, make timeless choices and find less permanent/expensive ways to make your spaces current.

Of course, these questions are just the beginning of a project that should be purposeful. For some pouring over colors swatches and tile & hardware options is fun; for others, it's a chore. If you find yourself in the latter, don't hesitate to enlist the help of a professional. And, even if you enjoy it, an expert set of eyes can help you navigate a sea of choices at a range of price points.

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC, an interior decorator and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia. 

What to Know When You Are Selling & Buying: Q&A with Greg Kingsbury

In the Washington, DC area, it's not uncommon for homeowners to climb the property ladder, gaining equity over time and upgrading to a home that better fits their longer-term needs (instead of buying that forever home from the start).

Kingsbury

Kingsbury

Some owners will hold onto their first property as an investment but many will want or need to sell it to move onto their next house. In a less competitive market, having a contingency around the sale of a home is not uncommon but, in this region, it can make getting your offer accepted more challenging. However, there are options...and we tapped into the expertise of local lender Greg Kingsbury, who leads the Kingsbury Mortgage Team at Caliber Home Loans, to answer some of the most common questions when looking to sell and buy in short order:
 
What is the #1 question or concern homeowners come to you with when they are looking to sell their current home and buy a new home?

Of course all situations are different so many prospective borrowers will have different questions based on their individual scenarios. If I had to narrow it down to a single question, it would be how to qualify for a home prior to selling their current home. Most of the time this is based upon wanting to declutter and make minor improvements to their home so it looks best and will command the most value on the sale.

The advice that seems to get thrown around the most is to just go get a bridge loan. I find that most clients are told to go get one, but don’t really know what a bridge loan actually it is.  Many think it is some kind of magical loan that just gives you your equity to allow you to buy something new. The truth I find is that most people won’t qualify for a bridge loan. When getting a bridge loan, you have to qualify carrying your current mortgage, the new mortgage and a payment on the bridge loan. There usually also are substantial costs to the bridge loan, generally in the form of a few points paid on the amount (in addition to closing and recording costs). The other common misconception is that you can get a bridge loan for all of your equity.  Most providers of bridge loans don’t want to exceed 80% of the value of the residence you are departing inclusive of any outstanding debt.  

So, what options are available to sellers who are looking to qualify for and finance their new home purchase? 

There are several options to consider when trying to qualify to move up and buy a new home. There is the bridge loa, but often times, as noted above, that doesn’t work or isn’t cost effective.

There is a lot of misinformation out there, so do yourself a favor and talk to someone that is local and, even better, someone that has been referred.
— Greg Kingbsury of Caliber Home Loans

The second option is doing a lower down payment with the intention of paying down that loan after closing with the proceeds of the sale after the departed residence sells. This is usually accomplished by a principal reduction followed by a loan recast. (A loan recast is when your loan servicer re-amortizes your loan after a large principal payment.) Usually the minimum required for a recast is $5,000. This allows you to get a lower payment without having to refinance your loan and allows you to keep your current interest rate. The recast just takes your new principal balance and adjusts the payments to still keep the original loan maturity date.

A third option is a combo loan. This is where you have a first and second mortgage with the intention of paying off the second mortgage after the sale of the departed residence leaving you with just the single first mortgage. 

Aside from working with a top-notch agent, what recommendations do you have for your clients who are looking to "move up"?

Do your homework upfront and budget accordingly. Make sure you get all the numbers and consider things on a worst-case scenario. You never know if the market is going to turn, and you have to hold onto a property longer than anticipated. Consider backup plans in the event you can’t sell. Find out what the rental market would command for your property. Would you be able to carry both payments if you had to hold onto it and rent? 

Are there any potential pitfalls when selling and buying as it relates to mortgages? If so, how can clients avoid or minimize the chance of these?

The only pitfall I can think of is not having everything reviewed up front to make sure you really qualify for what you are hoping to get into. You may have your credit pulled and someone take a quick look and think everything is ok but, if they aren’t asking questions about the total picture, you could all of a sudden not qualify. If the debt ratios are close and a bank is only looking at a credit report and not asking if there are additional items such as condo fees, taxes not included in the mortgage, child support/alimony, etc., it could look on paper like you’d fully qualify and once all the pieces are put together you end up not qualifying.

This can all be avoided by being upfront about everything and making sure that the lender you speak to has the full picture when they are reviewing your file. 

The DC area real estate market is competitive and buyers often need few or no contingencies to win with sellers. How do you work with a buyer’s agent to strengthen their offer?

We try to get as much information at the beginning to make sure that there are no concerns with their ability to get financing. If there is an option to waive contingencies, this definitely helps win offers. However, waiving contingencies can put borrowers in a difficult spot and prove to be very costly if something were to go wrong. But, with the right questions asked and the appropriate documents supplied and reviewed, these risks can be mitigated to protect the borrower while also allowing them to present the strongest offer possible. We’ve been able to help buyers with financing beat out all cash offers with these strategies. 

What is the best piece of advice you have have for prospective homebuyers today? 

Take some time to set up a call with a trusted loan officer before you go out looking at anything. You should be able to have a conversation about your individual situation and get a real understanding of your options. From there, ask for scenario sheets to show you perspective loan options.

There is a lot of misinformation out there, so do yourself a favor and talk to someone that is local and, even better, someone that has been referred. A random contact from the Internet has no vested interest if they steer you wrong or something goes wrong. They can just move on to the next online lead. A local person lives on the referral. They have a more vested interest to see you succeed as their livelihood depends on satisfying each customer to keep the referrals coming.

Thank you to Greg for sharing his experience and knowledge, and make sure to connect with the Kingsbury Team on Facebook and Twitter for more mortgage insights.

Three P's of Selling Your Home

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In a hot real estate market, like the Washington, DC area, there sometimes is the misconception that all you need to do to sell a house is put a sign in the yard and list it on the MLS. However, there is much more that goes into selling a home...and doing it for the maximum price possible in the current market. 

While there is a list of more than 100 things I do before listing a home for a client, I like to focus on the "Three Ps" when advising homeowners on what to expect in our initial consultation:

1. Preparation: Depending on the condition of your home, the market and your ability to invest in repairs and updates, there may be a short or long list of recommended items to tend to. Some will be absolutely necessary, like ensuring major systems are operational or that there is fresh, neutral paint throughout; while others may be advisable to increase your potential of top dollar, like updating features and fixtures in kitchens and bathrooms or staging your home.

Every property is different, and we'll talk through the reasoning behind each recommendation and why it may be a smart investment. Some projects may take a quick trip to Home Depot and a day of labor and others may require more planning and a professional. For this reason, you should consult with a real estate agent as soon as you know (or are fairly confident that) you will be selling. This allows Realtors like me to prepare a recommended plan and timeline, so you don't add undue stress to the homeselling process.

2. Pricing: At every initial consultation with a client, I will be prepared with a range of market insights, including relevant comparables (aka comps), so that I can make a recommendation on list price after seeing a client's home. That recommendation begins as a narrow range and where we land ultimately depends on the repairs and updates made, recent sales and available inventory at the time we list and other circumstances and requirements (e.g., you need a buyer who will allow you to rent back your home for 30-60 days). 

Pricing, ultimately, is a means to an end...maximizing your net after paying off your mortgage (if applicable) and other closing costs. The right price will get the greatest number of potential buyers in the door and, in some cases, you may get multiple offers that could escalate above list price; in other instances, you may find the market telling you that it thinks your home is priced too high -- either by a lack of offers or only offers that are effectively below list. The goal is to price right from the beginning leveraging data but to be prepared to make a swift changed if needed.

3. Promotion: Preparing your home with repairs & updates, as well as staging and pricing it correctly are the foundation, but promotion is key to ensuring that you reach the right audiences. Promotion spans dozens of activities, including:

  • Professional Photography
  • Signage & Flyers
  • Custom Websites, Tours & URLs
  • Email Marketing to Agents & Potential Buyers
  • Open Houses for Neighbors, Agents & Buyers
  • Social Media Content, Especially Graphics & Video
  • Buyer Incentives, Like Home Warranties

There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to promotion, so having an agent versed in PR, marketing and social media strategy is a huge asset. Strategic promotion will try to maximize the reach, but be targeted toward those who have the greatest potential of bringing or being a buyer.

As you can see in this brief exploration, there are seemingly limitless considerations that can have clear consequences on how much your home sells for (and how quickly). Ultimately, you're behind the wheel...but let a trusted agent be your navigator and partner on the road to the closing table. 

 

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia. 

Setting the 'Stage' for a Successful Sale

Staging. If you turn on HGTV or talk to anyone who actively stalks neighborhood listings online (you know you do!), it's a hot topic that generates various opinions — from being expensive and overrated to a must in this market.

As an interior decorator and real estate agent, I have clearly seen the value of staging for sellers but also know that the process can be challenging for homeowners. With that in mind, I thought I'd share a few tips for those selling their home on how to approach the topic when the time comes to list:

Property Staged with Owner's Furniture & Accessories

Property Staged with Owner's Furniture & Accessories

  1. Staging vs. Interior Design: While it is not uncommon for interior designers and/or decorators to run staging businesses, interior design is not the same thing as staging. Staging focuses primarily on the visual aspects of spaces, while interior design (well, good interior design) focuses on the function just as much, if not more. 
     
  2. Staging Is Expensive: While staging an empty house is not inexpensive, market research has proven time and time again that staging has a positive correlation with the contract price and length of time before contract. It is important to look at staging as an investment and not simply an expense because, if done well, you will recoup and make money because of it.
     
  3. It's All or Nothing: While you certainly will have more work to do if you are starting with an empty house, staging doesn't always mean fully furnishing every living space. For properties with more than two bedrooms, I sometimes recommend selective staging. You want to focus your efforts on the most important spaces to most buyers (living room, kitchen, master bedroom, etc.) and then add on other spaces as need and budget allows. For example, you may want to stage a smaller or potentially awkward space to illustrate how it can function, say as an office or nursery. 
     
  4. No Need to Stage If I'm Living Here: If you are living in a house while it's on the market, that's an even bigger reason to stage your spaces. One of the services I offer my clients (and other Realtors) is working with their existing furniture and accessories to highlight their home and appeal to the most potential buyers. Decluttering and depersonalizing spaces is the first step in any staging plan. 
     
  5. It's Personal: Selling a home is an emotional process, and it's important to realize the moment you decide you are selling that the home is no longer yours. As an agent, my goal is to help you meet yours — whether that's a high offer, quick close or any other number of terms. When you separate yourself from the property and realize the recommendations made and actions taken are necessary to reach your goals, you can appreciate (or at least tolerate) creating and living in a show home temporarily. 
Leave Room for Buyers to See What a Space Could Be

Leave Room for Buyers to See What a Space Could Be

If you are thinking about selling your home, you have many choices when it comes to hiring a Realtor. Beyond setting the appropriate list price, marketing (which includes staging) is the most important factor in optimizing your outcome. Make sure your agent is an expert in real estate as well as all aspects of marketing (design, social media, digital advertising, etc.) and you'll be on your way to the closing table. And, of course, if you need that breadth and depth of experience in the DC metro area, you know where to find me!

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia. 

Fall Is the Perfect Time to Start Getting Ready for the Spring Market

As the leaves are just starting to turn, spring may seem ages away...but not when you are considering selling and/or buying a home.

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Whether you are a first-time buyer or a veteran property owner, now is the time to start making your to-do list so you can be prepared when April and May arrive and so you have a head start on the competition.

Below are a some key tasks and tips for both buyers and sellers to get you going, but please reach out if you'd like to discuss your needs in more depth. I am already holding appointments with spring clients, and I'd love to meet with you!

Selling Your Home

  1. Forget spring cleaning, fall is the time! We've all been there when moving day is around the corner and your plans to organize and purge are thrown out the window in favor of dumping a drawer at a time into a box labeled "stuff." Take advantage of the cooler days to sort through everything from books and clothes to those dusty bins under beds and in closets. If you have't used it in the past year, if you have multiples or if it doesn't fit, it's likely time to find it a new home. By paring down your belongings (including furniture), you'll be a step ahead when staging your home (where less is always more) and when it's time to ultimately pack and move.
     
  2. Make those fixes you've been putting off. When you live in a home, you tend to overlook little imperfections -- from a cracked tile or two to a window that sticks. However, it's the little things that often catch the eye of potential buyers and leads them to assume they could be an indicator of bigger problems. Walk through your home with a critical eye and identify the fixes, big and small, that need attention and then tackle one a week.
     
  3. Interview and select your REALTOR®. Most agents, including me, are already looking toward spring and filling their books with clients. Partnering with an agent now allows you to develop a rapport and prepare a detailed marketing plan to maximize the potential return on your sale. 
     
  4. Identify smart upgrades that can help your house stand out with buyers. If you've done #3, this is something your agent will happily do with you, walking your home and identifying updates that will likely yield a faster sale and higher sales price. Upgrades may be painting woodwork white, upgrading a kitchen counter or even replacing light switches that are yellowed and showing their age. Together you can prioritize based on level of effort/expense and potential return.
     
  5. Follow the market! While spring undoubtedly starts the busiest time of year in real estate, there are lots of dynamics at play that can affect a market, such as rising interest rates and changes to consumer confidence. Your real estate agent will be your guide, but you should be engaged as well...especially if you are planning to buy!

Buying Your Home

  1. Check your credit. If you don't do so regularly and have not done so recently, get your free credit report from all three bureaus and make sure all the information is accurate (if not, you have time to try to remove incorrect information). You also can look for ways you can improve your credit score, such as lowering or eliminating credit card balances. 
     
  2. Interview and select your REALTOR®. While there is usually less lead time in getting ready if you are just buying, having an agent take you through the current market dynamics and home buying process (especially if you are a first-time buyer or someone who hasn't bought in many years) is essential.
     
  3. Understand your buying power and define your budget. You may already have a lender but, if you don't, your real estate agent can recommend trusted lenders...and you always should shop around. While you may have used an online calculator or app to approximate what you would be approved for, an experienced lender can give you the best idea of your buying power and what to expect in the coming months. This means you'll go into the spring market with clear expectations of what's attainable and ready for pre-approval.
     
  4. Start to research and explore neighborhoods. While you might have a good idea of where you want to live, now is the time to expand your consideration set (for example, if your budget means your ideal location may not be in reach). Read hyperlocal blogs, like Petworth News or Brookland Bridge, grab drinks or dinner at new-to-you restaurants and talk to friends about their communities. In the end, your new home may be where you least expected!
     
  5. Mind your finances. Even if your credit is stellar and you have a healthy amount in the bank, pay close attention to your spending habits to avoid penny pinching and stress closer to when you buy (and after). Most everyone is aware that there are closing costs associated with purchasing a home, but also remember you may need to hire movers, buy new furniture and more.

To set up a time for your free listing or buyer consultation, contact me today

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia.