Renovation

The 411 on Renovation Loans with Movement Mortgage's Duke Walker

While most buyers want a turnkey new home, many have dreams of finding and updating that fixer upper (thanks, HGTV) or, more commonly, can’t find that “perfect” property in their market due to limited inventory and/or budget.

Fortunately, if you don’t have the extra cash to put into updates (which is not uncommon with real estate prices in the DC area), there are financing options that let you tackle everything from a basic kitchen or bathroom update to more extensive renovations. To shed some light on these, I caught up with Duke Walker of Movement Mortgage, a native Washingtonian and current Capitol Hill resident who has helped hundreds of families in the region with their mortgage needs.

Walker

Walker

With limited inventory in the DC area, are you seeing more buyers considering and purchasing homes that they want to make renovations to right away? What mortgage options are there for those that may not be in a position to self-fund those?

Yes, there has been an increase in buyers looking at homes that are in-between “shell/unfinanceable” and “turnkey/brand new.” At Movement Mortgage, we offer and specialize in many renovation loans, which allow people to finance the purchase of the property in additional to the construction work needed to update the house to their specifications.

Can you briefly explain the different types of renovation loans and who they work best for?

There are renovation loans offered by FHA (203k), Fannie Mae/Conventional (HomeStyle) and the VA (Veterans Affairs).

There are two types of FHA loan, 203k Standard and 203k Limited. Both loans require only 3.5% down payment. Standard covers many “major” repairs, such as structural repairs, moving or altering a load-bearing wall, or even knocking the house down to rebuild it as long as you leave part of the existing foundation intact. 203k Limited covers a max of $35,000 toward repairs. This loan type is intended for less intensive changes or updates such as roof repair, replacement of HVAC systems, flooring or minor remodeling work.

The conventional reno loan is called HomeStyle. It has a minimum of 5% down but no minimum renovation cost required. HomeStyle also has an option for investors. It can be used on a single unit property with all renovation work allowed, including luxury additions, and a minimum down payment of 15%.

Download a chart comparing the various renovation products, courtesy of Movement Mortgage.

What are the major differences in the process between a “standard” mortgage and a renovation product?

The primary difference is that a renovation loan requires a bid from a licensed contractor detailing the work to be done on the home. That bid has to be completed prior to an appraisal on the property. An appraiser will inspect and review the house in its current condition, as well as review the bid from the contractor in order to come up with what’s referred to as the “after improved value.” Often times, waiting on the bid can push the timeline out 7-10 days further than the “standard” mortgage approval process.

Click the image to download.

Click the image to download.

Can anyone do the reno? Could the borrower or a family member complete the renovation?

The work has to be done by a licensed contractor and that person cannot be the buyer or a family member of the buyer.

Are there any frequent misconceptions buyers (or agents) have about renovation loans?

The typical misconception has to do with the length of the process. It does not have to take forever. Most of our renovation loans go to close in 30-45 days, sometimes sooner. If the contractor is on board and motivated to do their part, there’s no reason it should take more than a month to close.

How can current homeowners take advantage of these options, whether they are planning to sell or not?

These renovation products can not only be used in a purchase transaction but also in a refinance. For example, if you wanted to put $30,000 into a kitchen remodel but don’t have the equity position for a HELOC (home equity line of credit) or extra cash lying around, you could roll that cost into a mortgage and build equity!

Is there any final advice you have for buyers, in general, looking to purchase in the coming year?

Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty with a property. Some of the best deals out there are livable homes that just need a little bit of love. And don’t be afraid to talk with a mortgage lender such as myself. We don’t judge people. Our job is to guide and consult you from beginning to end of the home buying process. It never hurts to see where you stand financially and what possible loan products might be available to you.

Thank you to Duke for sharing his experience and knowledge, and feel free to connect with him on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, or reach out to him for your specific questions and needs.

Renovating with a Purpose: Setting Strategy Before Style

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When your space doesn't suit your needs as well as it used to, you may choose to make updates or move on to a home that's a better fit (which may also require updates, whether you are renting or selling). So, how do you decide what to spend your hard-earned money on?

With the proliferation of befores and afters on TV, Pinterest, Instagram and beyond, it's tempting to tear down walls and embrace the latest trend but, before making any changes, you should do so with intention. If you are choosing to sell, a top-notch real estate agent will advise you on what updates you should take on to maximize your potential profit and minimize time on market. If you're not there yet or haven't gotten advice, here are a few questions you should ask before you start shopping for contractors and finishes:

  1. Do I anticipate moving in five years or less? If you are planning to sell or rent your home immediately or in the next few years, you'll want to put the tightest filter on the renovations that you make. As you most likely have heard, kitchens and bathrooms often sell houses; however, that doesn't mean you need to re-do them. Sometimes simple updates like new appliances or countertops or painting vanities and staining grout are the smartest choice. If you are planning to keep the property but find tenants, your criteria should be even more selective and, in both cases for renovations that you do take on, remember that your goal is to not match your tastes perfectly but to appeal to the widest audience (while minimizing your investment within reason).
     
  2. How will my house stack up to its competition? If you are selling or renting, the biggest misstep is often not understanding the local market (and I mean hyper-local) and your competition. While sand-in-place hardwood floors and marble countertops and a decorative backsplash may be the best of the best, is that the norm for your neighborhood? Will prospective buyers or tenants pay a premium for that? This doesn't mean you have to throw style and aesthetics out the window, but you should run the numbers and choose the best option for your budget and your target audience, most importantly.
     
  3. Am I planning to stay indefinitely? If you do plan on staying in the home for years to come, it may make sense to splurge on higher-end finishes and custom features...if they will bring you joy (yes, happiness is worth investing in). In this case, think through the function and form of your spaces. What bothers you on a daily basis -- maybe kitchen drawers that stick or a lack of a laundry room near bedrooms? What have you seen in friend's homes that has you repeatedly saying, "I need that in my next home"? Finally, planning to stay doesn't mean you should inject every current trend in your renovation. Instead, make timeless choices and find less permanent/expensive ways to make your spaces current.

Of course, these questions are just the beginning of a project that should be purposeful. For some pouring over colors swatches and tile & hardware options is fun; for others, it's a chore. If you find yourself in the latter, don't hesitate to enlist the help of a professional. And, even if you enjoy it, an expert set of eyes can help you navigate a sea of choices at a range of price points.

Amber Harris is the owner of At Home DC, an interior decorator and a licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties working with clients in DC, Maryland and Virginia.